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Nov 03

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The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

anne frank

Lexile Level: 1080

Grade Level(s): 6th-8th Grade

Group: All students

Rationale for Recommendation: The qualitative and quantitative measures for this text prove that it would be beneficial to teach to grades 6-8. Although the Lexile level seems high the language used is rather simple and easy to read. The underlining themes within the text are complex and that must be the reason for such a high Lexile score. Due to the fact that the book is written through a child’s eyes can increase student engagement as they relate to their author incorporating aspects and experiences from their own lives.

Submitted by: Jenna Archibald

 

Summary

When the Nazis occupied Holland, a thirteen-year-old girl and her Jewish family left their home and went into hiding. For two years they, as well as another family, hid in an old abandoned office building. The diary gives vivid impressions of this experience where people faced hunger, boredom and the threat of discovery and death. The diary is a fascinating and moving account of these compelling truths of life for Jews during this historical time period.

Genre: Nonfiction, Classics, Diaries, Journals

Rationale for Teaching

This book portrays the Holocaust through the eyes of a young thirteen year old girl and describes instances of her and family trials and tribulations during this time. War and the historic past can be difficult for students to see the role in their own lives today. This book provides clarity for students who are the same age and provides rich details and descriptive language so that the situations can not only be heard but seen by a reader. Teaching this book can help close the gap between our historic past and the students in our classrooms today.

Themes and Topics

Europe, Holocaust, WWII, Family & Social, Concentration Camps, Nazis, Racism, Morals, Survival, Self Worth

Qualitative Measures

Structure

The structure of the text in relatively simple. Due to being a journal the text reads simply using first person and detailed descriptions regarding instances and situations the author personal experienced herself.

Language Conventionality and Clarity

The diary was original written in Dutch and has now been translated into more than 60 different languages. Although translation occurred the language exercised is still very personal and private. Every student is able to view this book with a contrast to his or her own personal life.

Knowledge Demands: Life Experiences

The text assumes relatively little or no prior knowledge regarding the situation these families find themselves in. However the Holocaust affected everyone of that time period differently regarding death, concentration camps, Nazis and hiding. This provides another perspective for students that may differ from ones explored previously regarding the content.

Levels of Meaning

 

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank SKU UPC Model

Diary of Anne Frank

Nov 19, 2013 by Catherine Payne

In order to get the most out of this important book, students would require careful preparation for the content. Teachers would need to be sensitive to students who have come to North America from war torn countries.


4.0 4.0 1 1 In order to get the most out of this important book, students would require careful preparation for the content. Teachers would need to be sensitive to students who have come to N The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

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Permanent link to this article: http://ttbyl.net/2013/11/03/the-diary-of-a-young-girl-by-anne-frank/

2 comments

  1. Kristin Cywinski

    I loved this book as a child, and it was the first introduction I had to the Holocaust. There is an excellent Teacher’s Guide with historical information, writing activities, and ways to use technology to connect with readers all over the world about this important work.
    www-tc.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/annefrank/annefrank_teachersguide.pdf.

  2. Andre

    I think that in addition to being a good text for teaching history and practicing reading, it can also be an introduction to journaling, which can be a powerful outlet for students. I think that this is a really good book to use with at risk students, or students in general who really need some coping techniques.

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